Big Car wants to turn Indiana away from its xenophobic tendencies

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Indiana residents, locally nicknamed hoosiers, have a surprisingly accurate term for their lifestyle: “Backyard” culture. Urban analyst Aaron Renn states it accurately when he says that hoosiers mostly interact with others like themselves, who act the same way and talk the same way. Instead of investing time talking to strangers on busses or trains, they tend to interact with a limited profile of people with similar interests.

 

Big Car, an urban art group, is hoping to lay the groundwork for change in all that through urban art. By working hand in hand with local government, they have started a group colloquially known as the “Ministry of Yes”. They hope to draw urban hoosiers out of their houses and “backyard” culture in to a more interactive area. Where normally, Indiana hasn’t been very liberal in celebrating urban art in all its guises, this group’s goal is to say “Yes” to anyone who can positively impact the culture and interactivity of the park around them.

 

Showing such an ingeniously progressive step towards a friendlier city of hoosiers is an incredible feat. Big Car’s considerable dedication to furthering the culture and soul of Indiana has the unexpected benefit of bringing Indiana’s residents closer together. Hopefully the impromptu lessons on street dancing, wall murals, and galleries of locally produced art will help undo what over a century of history has taught the xenophobic hoosiers, and help them connect in new and exciting ways.

 

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Any controversial bill causes a division when being voted on, normally between republicans and democrats. A new bill about the budget and financial needs of the United States Postal Service is dividing the country along a seldom seen line: urban residents and rural residents of the United States are fighting a fierce battle of “Not in My Yard” about where USPS will close its post offices.

Mostly because there are simply more residents in urban areas, the vote often greatly favors urban dwellers over less populated areas. The driving idea of democracy is to fit the needs of the majority. The counter point to this is that rural America is claiming office closures in their area will more greatly impact them than if they occur in more densely populated cities. Whether or not this is true is a matter of great debate.

The postal service, who wrote up the first plan for post office closures, just wants congress to stop pretending that they are so many heads of the postal service, and simply rely upon someone with experience to advise them as to the needs of the post office. Whatever the solution ends up being, this will certainly be an interesting debate.

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